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Something Really Impressive: Combining Your Old and New Tech

Legacy systems have been around in any given environment for a long time because they’re really good at what they do

Having the latest technologies can be great. But gambling with a possibly steep learning curve and the risk of unexpected faults in new technology can cost your organization more than just the expense of the upgrade. Why run these risks when your current tech already does what you need it to do?

CIOs are constantly pushing to be on the cutting edge, but sometimes they don't realize everything involved in an upgrade process. They think that having a new, shiny data center or applications that include the latest buzzwords, like cloud, is impressive, but why not just improve the old technology? CIOs often ask for the same capabilities they have now in a different format. Why not just make the older technology communicate better with the newer tech? Your boss will probably be more impressed if you can provide the capabilities they want with the technology you already have.

Legacy systems have been around in any given environment for a long time because they're really good at what they do. It's more impressive to make your legacy technology and your modern technology work together in harmony than upgrade to the newest, shiniest system.

In a rush to adapt cloud-based, everything-as-a-service newness, organizations are overlooking that they can make old technologies act modern. Rather than implementing a time-consuming, resource-intensive upgrade, it makes much more sense to keep all the things you have so your mainframes can work together with the new PCs and other devices people use.

The next time a CIO wants you to upgrade to the latest new technology, you should ask them what they are trying to accomplish and how they anticipate that helping the organization. That knowledge will help you understand you need a simple upgrade or a complete infrastructure overhaul.

Executives will continue to encourage upgrades or changes for various, and often legitimate, reasons. But you don't have to choose living with old, outdated technology or moving to the newest, most expensive system. Your mainframes and other legacy technology can work perfectly well in a rapidly increasing mobile environment. Instead of taking the easy way out, go for something that's really going to impress people: using what you have, and letting your technology do a better job than any other organization's IT infrastructure. Anyone can go buy the newest IT. It's how you use what you already have that can make the difference.

More Stories By David Fletcher

David Fletcher is a Senior Product Marketing Manager for Emulation and Maintenance with the Attachmate Corporation. David is an ambitious, energetic, results oriented business leader with expertise in analyzing, clarifying and directing the business of technical support.

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