Welcome!

Microsoft Cloud Authors: Lori MacVittie, Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Serafima Al, Janakiram MSV

Related Topics: PowerBuilder, Microsoft Cloud

PowerBuilder: Article

The PostOpen Event – Why It Is So Important

PowerBuilder fundamentals

Normally I try to write applications on the DataWindow or Appeon but every now and then I get a question that makes me sit back and say, "Huh?"

In this case the question concerns the PostOpen event. I've seen that event named different things: ue_post_open, postOpen, post_open, ue_postOpen, etc. It has, as far as I can see, always had post and open in the name of the event. Further, just about every framework that I've ever seen has had that event in the base window.

The question that I was asked was, "Why is that event there?"

The programmer wanted to know why there was code in the post open and why was it not just put at the end of the open event? At first I was really confused by the question. It was like he was asking me why do we have arrays? I just couldn't imagine not knowing the answer.

Then it occurred to me that I learned the answer to that question from a book that was published almost 20 years ago. As far as I can tell there are no new books on PowerBuilder and there are only two print magazines, this one and the ISUG magazine.

That's it.

Further I came to think of the tremendous responsibility that the few PowerBuilder authors share. New PowerBuilder programmers turn to us for information and there aren't that many of us left writing. So that leaves a whole lot of PowerBuilder programmers who get all their training from reading the code of other programmers.

Often those other programmers were consultants who wrote the code ten years ago and worked for consulting firms that no longer exist.

To make a bad situation worse a lot of times those programmers are brave souls that have been recruited from other disciplines. When the company finds that their last PowerBuilder programmer has just quit because he got a much better offer they turn to their existing programming staff and ask who would like to pick up PowerBuilder. They may point out that there are 6 or 10 or, as in the case for one company for which I recently worked, 26 PowerBuilder programs that are all critical to the company. The PowerBuilder programmer would become indispensable to the company.

So suddenly a brave Visual Basic or Java programmer finds PowerBuilder installed on his machine. His boss pats him on his pointy little head and tells him that Google is his friend.

Where would you turn? If you picked up the mantle and offered to learn a language that you knew nothing about, what would you do? You'd turn to Amazon or Google. If you type "best PowerBuilder books" in Google the first mentioned is my Definitive DataWindow which was published 13 years ago and is embarrassingly out of date...and out of print.

Let's go to Amazon, there you will find the latest PowerBuilder book is for version 9. It was published 10 years ago. Since then... nothing.

Why should I be surprised that things that I find fundamental are entirely unknown by the newest PowerBuilder programmers.

Warning: If you are a seasoned PowerBuilder programmer the rest of this article will bore you silly.

There is an open event in a window. This is the event that happens when the window is "opened." Now the word ‘open' can be deceptive. A lot of people feel that a window is only opened when it is shown on the screen.

That would be wrong.

The open of a window begins when the open command is issued. That is to say, with a line like:

Open(w_client_editor)

The problem, the whole reason that a post open event is required goes all the way back to Microsoft Windows 3.0 Old Windows programmers will remember version 3.0 very well. Version 3.0 was almost the death of Microsoft Windows. It was unbearably slow. I am not exaggerating; it was the slowest version of Windows that was ever released.

It was so slow that Windows users were seriously studying what the impact of changing to another - any other - operating system would be.

This time Microsoft listened... and panicked. They did a study to determine what it is that makes the user perceive speed in an application. What could be changed to cause the user to believe that the application is faster with minimal real change to the operating system? It wasn't that Microsoft didn't want to address their problems with speed, they most certainly did, but addressing those problems would take time that Microsoft just didn't have. Microsoft was about to lose a lot of customers and once lost, it would be hard to get them back.

Microsoft learned that the visual perception strongly influenced the user's perception of speed. They learned that if the window POPPED onto the screen, all at once, even if the data wasn't there yet, then the users perceived speed. What killed the user perception was when they pressed a button and nothing happened for four seconds. The user would often punch that button two or three times. So Microsoft created operating system queues.

The graphics queue happened before the application queue. So graphics could be given a higher priority than the application and windows would paint faster. They released version 3.1 which was mostly just the addition of these queues (along with other changes like a floating point emulator in assembly code).

This was great but it broke the relationship of the open event with the code. This meant that you weren't guaranteed that everything would be created in the window until after the open event finishes.

Consider this code:

W_customer.open() event
Dw_1.setTransObject(sqlca)
Dw_1.retrieve()

This code would often result in a "Null object reference" error because dw_1 had not been created by Microsoft when the code ran.

Imagine how we felt when this happened. There was a null object reference in line 1 of the open event, but, but, but... that's dw_1. There it is, right there on the window! How can it be null? It's not dynamic. You put it there.

Okay, we learned that we should not put anything in the open event that referred to anything on the screen. Most of us learned to just not put anything at all in the open event except one line in the ancestor:

W_root.open() event
post event ue_post_open( )

For reasons already stated I imagine I can't rely on you knowing the difference between post event and trigger event or for that matter between postOpen and post open.

Okay, one at a time. Posting an event means that Microsoft Windows will open this window after the rest of the code in this script is executed. Basically it means, "Do this when you get a chance." So if you add that to the open event of your root window then it will call the ue_post_open event after all of the code in all of the descendants of this window is done.

Keep in mind the order of execution of events. First PowerBuilder goes to the farthest ancestor and then starts executing down the inheritance tree. If you have w_grandpa, and w_pa inherits from that and w_son inherits from that then the code in w_grandpa.open would execute first, then the code in w_pa, finally the code in w_son.

This means that if we put the post event in the open of w_grandpa, then the ue_post_open would happen after the last open event in the descendants. In our example:

W_grandpa.open->w_pa.open->w_son.open-> w_grandpa.ue_post_open-> w_son.ue_post_open->w_son.post_open

All that we have to do is create a ue_post_open event in our root window. We don't have to put anything in it, just create one. Then we post that event from the open event and we have a place now to put all our initialization code and don't have to worry about whether any object exists or not.

More important the screen will quickly draw or paint, giving the user the perception of speed. If you need to retrieve data and know it will take a short time, then you can set the pointer to an hourglass. I guarantee that your user will feel the window is faster.

I mentioned that most of us learned not to put anything in the open event. There is an exception to that rule. When your window is opened with a parameter then you should access the message object as the first line of code in your window.

Let me give you an example. Suppose that you open a window with a customer_id. You are going to use that customer_id as a parameter to the datawindow dw_1. Here is what you would do.

W_calling_window
Long ll_customer_id
Ll_customer_id = dw_detail.getItemNumber(dw_detail.getRow(), "customer_id")
openWithParm(w_customer_detail, ll_customer_id)

Now in the w_customer_detail window you need to set an instance variable. That's because we have just passed a variable to the new window and we are going to get it in the open event but we are going to retrieve the DataWindow in the ue_postOpen event. So let's do this. I will assume that you know how to declare an instance variable. Let's name it il_customer_id. Now let's look at the open event of w_customer_detail.

W_customer_detail.open()
il_customer_detail = message.longParm

Okay, now in the open event of w_customer_detail we have taken the longParm property of the global message object and put it in an instance variable.

Since we have inherited the w_customer_detail from whatever our base window is, the ue_postOpen event will automatically fire. That means that we don't have to fire off the event. Now I just have to put the code that we need in the window.

W_customer_detail.ue_postOpen()
dw_customer_info.setTransObject(sqlca)
dw_customer.retrieve(il_customer_detail)

Let's Do Some Housekeeping
I think that we've pretty well covered the post open event but in the process of doing that I've brought up a couple of other issues that I'd like to cover just to be complete.

First let's talk about post event as opposed to postEvent.

With the post event command you must know the name of the event that you want to post. You can pass the parameters normally. However, just like calling a function, the event has to exist and the parameters must be correct.

On the other hand the postEvent function takes a string as a parameter and that string is the name of the event. This means that you can store the name of the event in a table. In fact the event doesn't even have to exist. If it doesn't then nothing will happen. There will be no error thrown.

This makes the postEvent perfect for security systems where you can post an event based on a security role. Here is some code that might work for you in a menu event.

M_main.m_file.m_save.clicked
Datastore ld_security, ld_events
ld _secutity = create datastore
ld_events = create datastore

ld_events.dataobject = "d_events"
ld_security.dataobject = "d_get_security"

ld_events.setTransObject(sqlca)
ld_security.setTransObject(sqlca)

parentWindow.postEvent(ld_events.retrieve(ld_security.retrieve(gs_user_id)))

Using the postOpen function is very flexible but it is limited in the parameters that can be passed it. If you use the post event command, you can pass any number of parameters that you wish. The caveat is that the event must exist or you will get a compile time error. So the event that you used before for security cannot be done.

All that I just said for the postEvent and post event command applies also to the triggerEvent and trigger event commands.

Finally I'd like to mention the global message object.

This object is global. It can be accessed at any time by any other object. That means that if you access the message object in the postOpen event then another window may have changed your message object properties and this could corrupt what you are expecting.

Don't take this lightly. More than once I've debugged and found this error and believe me it is difficult to find. The problem is that it is not an error with logic or data but a timing error. These can be close to impossible to find.

Please take my word for this, make it a golden rule. If you open a window with a parameter, the first thing you do in the target or opened window is grab that value from the message object and store it.

Also, if you do a closeWithReturn then you need to immediately get the value from the message object.

There you have it. I've covered in some detail some basic information that might not be so easily learned any more.

More Stories By Richard (Rik) Brooks

Rik Brooks has been programming in PowerBuilder since the final beta release before version 1. He has authored or co-authored five books on PowerBuilder including “The Definitive DataWindow”. Currently he lives in Mississippi and works in Memphis, Tennessee.

Comments (1) View Comments

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Most Recent Comments
ywerde 02/20/13 04:14:00 PM EST

In your introduction you clearly state the problem new PowerBuilder developers face when they find the IDE installed on their machine. You then go on to talk about the lack of current training materials.
One important cost effective training resource you omitted is the online training from ISUG/eLearnIT. Everyone can learn more here.

@ThingsExpo Stories
"MobiDev is a software development company and we do complex, custom software development for everybody from entrepreneurs to large enterprises," explained Alan Winters, U.S. Head of Business Development at MobiDev, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
Major trends and emerging technologies – from virtual reality and IoT, to Big Data and algorithms – are helping organizations innovate in the digital era. However, to create real business value, IT must think beyond the ‘what’ of digital transformation to the ‘how’ to harness emerging trends, innovation and disruption. Architecture is the key that underpins and ties all these efforts together. In the digital age, it’s important to invest in architecture, extend the enterprise footprint to the cl...
Data is the fuel that drives the machine learning algorithmic engines and ultimately provides the business value. In his session at Cloud Expo, Ed Featherston, a director and senior enterprise architect at Collaborative Consulting, discussed the key considerations around quality, volume, timeliness, and pedigree that must be dealt with in order to properly fuel that engine.
Two weeks ago (November 3-5), I attended the Cloud Expo Silicon Valley as a speaker, where I presented on the security and privacy due diligence requirements for cloud solutions. Cloud security is a topical issue for every CIO, CISO, and technology buyer. Decision-makers are always looking for insights on how to mitigate the security risks of implementing and using cloud solutions. Based on the presentation topics covered at the conference, as well as the general discussions heard between sessio...
IoT is rapidly becoming mainstream as more and more investments are made into the platforms and technology. As this movement continues to expand and gain momentum it creates a massive wall of noise that can be difficult to sift through. Unfortunately, this inevitably makes IoT less approachable for people to get started with and can hamper efforts to integrate this key technology into your own portfolio. There are so many connected products already in place today with many hundreds more on the h...
No hype cycles or predictions of zillions of things here. IoT is big. You get it. You know your business and have great ideas for a business transformation strategy. What comes next? Time to make it happen. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jay Mason, Associate Partner at M&S Consulting, presented a step-by-step plan to develop your technology implementation strategy. He discussed the evaluation of communication standards and IoT messaging protocols, data analytics considerations, edge-to-cloud tec...
Announcing Poland #DigitalTransformation Pavilion
Digital Transformation is much more than a buzzword. The radical shift to digital mechanisms for almost every process is evident across all industries and verticals. This is often especially true in financial services, where the legacy environment is many times unable to keep up with the rapidly shifting demands of the consumer. The constant pressure to provide complete, omnichannel delivery of customer-facing solutions to meet both regulatory and customer demands is putting enormous pressure on...
CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO are the world's most influential, independent events where Cloud Computing was coined and where technology buyers and vendors meet to experience and discuss the big picture of Digital Transformation and all of the strategies, tactics, and tools they need to realize their goals. Sponsors of DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities.
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that All in Mobile, a mobile app development company from Poland, will exhibit at the 22nd International CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO. All In Mobile is a mobile app development company from Poland. Since 2014, they maintain passion for developing mobile applications for enterprises and startups worldwide.
The best way to leverage your CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO presence as a sponsor and exhibitor is to plan your news announcements around our events. The press covering CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO will have access to these releases and will amplify your news announcements. More than two dozen Cloud companies either set deals at our shows or have announced their mergers and acquisitions at CloudEXPO. Product announcements during our show provide your company with the most reach through our targeted audienc...
@DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo, taking place November 12-13 in New York City, NY, is co-located with 22nd international CloudEXPO | first international DXWorldEXPO and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world.
Everything run by electricity will eventually be connected to the Internet. Get ahead of the Internet of Things revolution. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Akvelon expert and IoT industry leader Sergey Grebnov provided an educational dive into the world of managing your home, workplace and all the devices they contain with the power of machine-based AI and intelligent Bot services for a completely streamlined experience.
DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO are the world's most influential, independent events where Cloud Computing was coined and where technology buyers and vendors meet to experience and discuss the big picture of Digital Transformation and all of the strategies, tactics, and tools they need to realize their goals. Sponsors of DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities.
22nd International Cloud Expo, taking place June 5-7, 2018, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, and co-located with the 1st DXWorld Expo will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud ...
In his keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Sheng Liang, co-founder and CEO of Rancher Labs, discussed the technological advances and new business opportunities created by the rapid adoption of containers. With the success of Amazon Web Services (AWS) and various open source technologies used to build private clouds, cloud computing has become an essential component of IT strategy. However, users continue to face challenges in implementing clouds, as older technologies evolve and newer ones like Docker c...
JETRO showcased Japan Digital Transformation Pavilion at SYS-CON's 21st International Cloud Expo® at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. The Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO) is a non-profit organization that provides business support services to companies expanding to Japan. With the support of JETRO's dedicated staff, clients can incorporate their business; receive visa, immigration, and HR support; find dedicated office space; identify local government subsidies; get...
Dion Hinchcliffe is an internationally recognized digital expert, bestselling book author, frequent keynote speaker, analyst, futurist, and transformation expert based in Washington, DC. He is currently Chief Strategy Officer at the industry-leading digital strategy and online community solutions firm, 7Summits.
Bill Schmarzo, author of "Big Data: Understanding How Data Powers Big Business" and "Big Data MBA: Driving Business Strategies with Data Science," is responsible for setting the strategy and defining the Big Data service offerings and capabilities for EMC Global Services Big Data Practice. As the CTO for the Big Data Practice, he is responsible for working with organizations to help them identify where and how to start their big data journeys. He's written several white papers, is an avid blogge...
In past @ThingsExpo presentations, Joseph di Paolantonio has explored how various Internet of Things (IoT) and data management and analytics (DMA) solution spaces will come together as sensor analytics ecosystems. This year, in his session at @ThingsExpo, Joseph di Paolantonio from DataArchon, added the numerous Transportation areas, from autonomous vehicles to “Uber for containers.” While IoT data in any one area of Transportation will have a huge impact in that area, combining sensor analytic...