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Energy Management Information Systems: Global Markets

NEW YORK, Nov. 8, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue:

Energy Management Information Systems: Global Markets

http://www.reportlinker.com/p01027113/Energy-Management-Information-Syst...

INTRODUCTION

Building energy usage can be reduced by 5% to 20% or more by identifying and correcting operational issues. Building owners and operators have various incentives to reduce energy consumption, including adhering to business best practices, eliminating inefficiencies, reducing costs, participating in various governmental and private incentive programs, conserving energy resources and reducing carbon emissions.

Many of these issues can be managed by building operators, energy managers and other decision-makers using automated monitoring and control technologies that collectively are known as energy management information systems (EMIS), or sometimes enterprise energy management (EEM). This report uses the two terms interchangeably.

EMIS refers to data acquisition hardware, software and communication systems that provide energy information to commercial building energy managers, facility managers, financial managers and electric utilities. A number of providers offer products that are described as EMIS or EEM, although the specific details of their offerings differ widely between companies. This scope of this report also includes professional services that support the implementation of EMIS, such as needs analysis, project design and integration services.

EMIS solutions are applicable for commercial, governmental and nonprofit entities in every segment of the economy, although some segments are intrinsically more energy-intensive and thus have a greater incentive to adopt EMIS solutions, such as manufacturing operations and datacenters. A growing number of individual consumers are using custom-tailored EMIS solutions to manage their household energy use.

Although formalized EMIS solutions are not directly applicable for private consumers such as homeowners, historical analysis and decision support to enhance energy efficiency of EMIS are frequently accessible through the EMIS solutions employed by power providers. These power providers enable consumers to become more informed and more efficient by providing historical and current power usage or appliance-specific utility-usage data. Current data analysis tools, such as data warehouse technology and other computing practices, allow power providers to provide consumer power consumption data periodically and on demand with the ability to secure other consumer information, or to group the data in an endless variety of ways.

STUDY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

This report is an update of an earlier BCC Research report published in 2010. The overall goal of this report is to identify and prioritize the business opportunities for providers of EMIS solutions and related services that will arise over the next five years as these technologies increase their market penetration. In support of this goal, specific objectives of the report include:

Identifying the EMIS technologies and applications with the greatest commercial potential over the next five years (2012–2017).

Estimating the market for these technologies in 2011.

Analyzing the technical, economic and other demand drivers for these technologies, and other prerequisites of success in these markets.

Projecting the potential markets for these technologies through 2017.

INTENDED AUDIENCE

The report is intended especially for providers of EMIS technologies and solutions and related services. Although the report is structured around specific technologies, it is largely non-technical in nature. That is, it is concerned less with theory and jargon than with what works, how much of the latter the market is likely to purchase, and at what price.

As such, the report's main audience is executive management and marketing and financial analysts. It is not written specifically for scientists and technologists, although its findings concern the market for their work, including the availability of government and corporate research funding for different technologies and applications.

Government agencies and environmental and public policy groups with an interest in these areas should also find the report useful.

SCOPE AND FORMAT

The study covers the major segments of the EMIS market, which are defined as:

Industrial.

Business.

Governmental.

Residential.

The study addresses the major enabling technologies for the various types of home automation products, such as:

Sensors.

Software

Wiring and networking devices.

User interface devices.

Controllers.

Actuators and output devices (e.g., dimmers, automated window coverings, dampers, etc.).

The study format includes the following major elements:

Executive summary.

Definitions.

EMIS functions.

Enabling technologies.

Market environment (economic conditions, consumer attitudes).

Current (2011) and projected market for home automation technologies and products through 2017.

Developers and suppliers of EMIS products.

Key patents.

While the main focus of the report is on the U.S. market, it also analyzes international markets for EMIS products and services.

METHODOLOGY

Both primary and secondary research methodologies were used in preparing this study. The findings and conclusions of the EMIS RFID market are based on information gathered from developers, vendors, integrators and users of energy information systems. Interview data were combined with information gathered through an extensive review of secondary sources such as trade publications, trade associations, company literature and online databases to produce the baseline market estimates contained in this report.

With 2011 as a baseline, market projections for each market segment were developed for 2012 to 2017. The projections are based on a combination of a consensus among the primary contacts combined with BCC's understanding of the key market drivers and their impact from a historical and analytical perspective. The analytical methodologies used to generate the market estimates are described in detail, to enable the reader to evaluate their validity and substitute other assumptions and values, if desired.

All dollar projections presented in this report are in 2011 constant U.S. dollars.

AUTHOR'S CREDENTIALS

Andrew McWilliams, the author of this updated report, is a partner in the Boston-based international technology and marketing consulting firm 43rd Parallel LLC. He is the author of numerous other BCC Research business opportunity analyses, including reports on related areas such as EGY065B Enabling Technologies for the Smart Grid; IAS031B The U.S. Market for Home Automation and Security Technologies; ENV011A The U.S. Market for Clean Technologies; ENV003D U.S. Indoor Air Quality Market and ENV007B The U.S. Market for Green Building Materials.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1

STUDY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 1

INTENDED AUDIENCE 2

SCOPE AND FORMAT 2

METHODOLOGY 3

AUTHOR'S CREDENTIALS 3

RELATED PUBLICATIONS 3

BCC ON-LINE SERVICES 3

DISCLAIMER 4

CHAPTER 2 SUMMARY 6

SUMMARY TABLE GLOBAL EMIS MARKET, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 6

SUMMARY FIGURE GLOBAL EMIS MARKET, 2011-2017 ($ MILLIONS) 6

CHAPTER 3 OVERVIEW 9

GENERAL DESCRIPTION 9

TECHNOLOGY SEGMENTS 9

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 9

SOFTWARE 10

METERS AND SENSORS 10

Smart Meters 10

Other Meters and Sensors 11

USER INTERFACES AND DECISION SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES 11

ACTUATORS AND CONTROLLERS 12

COMMUNICATIONS 12

SERVICES 12

END USERS 12

MARKET SUMMARY 13

U.S. MARKET 13

TABLE 1 U.S. EMIS MARKET BY TYPE OF EQUIPMENT/SERVICE, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 13

FIGURE 1 U.S. EMIS MARKET, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 14

FIGURE 2 U.S. EMIS EQUIPMENT/SERVICE MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 14

TABLE 2 U.S. EMIS MARKET BY END-USER SEGMENT, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 16

FIGURE 3 U.S. EMIS EQUIPMENT/SERVICE MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 16

GLOBAL MARKET 17

TABLE 3 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET BY GEOGRAPHICAL SEGMENT, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 17

FIGURE 4 GLOBAL EMIS GEOGRAPHICAL MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 17

CHAPTER 4 ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT 20

SUMMARY 20

UTILITIES 20

AVAILABILITY OF CAPITAL FUNDING 20

FIGURE 5 U.S. SHAREHOLDER-OWNED UTILITIES' CAPITAL EXPENDITURES, 2005–2014 ($

BILLIONS) 20

INCENTIVES TO INVEST IN SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES 21

FIGURE 6 ANNUAL GROWTH IN U.S. ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, 2001-2015 (%) 21

COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING FIRMS AND GOVERNMENT 22

COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING FIRMS 23

Electricity Prices 23

FIGURE 7 TRENDS IN COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING ELECTRICITY PRICES, 2005-2011 (%

CHANGE VS. PREVIOUS YEAR) 23

Private Non-Residential Construction 23

FIGURE 8 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. PRIVATE, NON-RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PUT IN

PLACE, 2005–2017 ($ BILLIONS) 24

Investment Trends 24

FIGURE 9 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. GROSS PRIVATE NON-HOUSEHOLD INVESTMENT,

2005–2012 ($ BILLIONS) 24

GOVERNMENT 25

Public Construction 25

FIGURE 10 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. PUBLIC NON-INFRASTRUCTURE CONSTRUCTION

PUT IN PLACE, 2005–2017 ($ BILLIONS) 26

Public Investment 26

FIGURE 11 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. PUBLIC INVESTMENT, 2005–2012 ($ BILLIONS) 26

CONSUMERS 27

RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY PRICES 27

FIGURE 12 TRENDS IN RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY PRICES, 2005-2012 (% CHANGE VS.

PREVIOUS YEAR) 28

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS 28

FIGURE 13 TRENDS IN U.S. PUBLIC CONCERNS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING, 2001-2012 (%) 28

RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION 29

New Construction 29

FIGURE 14 TRENDS IN U.S. HOUSING STARTS, 2005-2017 (MILLION STARTS) 30

Renovations 30

TABLE 4 REMODELING MARKET INDEX TRENDS, 2005-2012 (RMI) 31

CONSUMER EXPENDITURES 32

FIGURE 15 RECENT TRENDS IN U.S. CONSUMER SPENDING, 2003-2010 (AVERAGE %

INCREASE/DECREASE VS. PREVIOUS YEAR) 32

CHAPTER 5 EMIS STANDARDS, LEGISLATION, REGULATION AND POLICY ENVIRONMENT 34

ENERGY MANAGEMENT STANDARDS 34

AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARD ON ENERGY MANAGEMENT ANSI/MSE 2000-2008 34

ISO 50001 ENERGY MANAGEMENT STANDARD 34

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS, REGULATIONS AND POLICIES 34

LEGISLATION 35

Energy Policy Act of 2005 35

Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 35

Section 1301. Statement of Policy on Modernization of Electricity Grid 36

Section 1302. Smart Grid System Report 36

Section 1303. Smart Grid Advisory Committee and Smart Grid Task Force 36

Section 1304. Smart Grid Technology Research, Development and

Demonstration 37

Section 1305. Smart Grid Interoperability Framework 37

Section 1307. State Consideration of Smart Grid 37

Section 1308. Study of the Effect of Private Wire Laws on the Development of

Combined Heat and Power Facilities 37

Section 1309. DOE Study of Security Attributes of Smart Grid Systems 38

Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 38

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 38

FEDERAL REGULATIONS 38

Rulings Expanding Use of Demand Response 38

Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering 2008 39

Executive Orders 39

Executive Order 13123 39

Executive Order 13423 39

Executive Order 13514 40

Other Federal Programs 40

Federal Energy Management Program 40

Energy Savings Performance Contracts 40

Department of Energy Industrial Technologies Program 41

STATE LEGISLATION AND REGULATION 41

Arizona 41

California 41

Oregon 42

Pennsylvania 42

Texas 43

Vermont 43

CHAPTER 6 EMIS IN OPERATION 45

EMIS IN OPERATION 45

FIGURE 16 EMIS IN OPERATION 46

ENERGY MANAGEMENT CONTROL PROCESS 49

FIGURE 17 ENERGY MANAGEMENT CONTROL PROCESS 49

CHAPTER 7 UTILITY EMIS 54

SUMMARY 54

FIGURE 18 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS,

2011-2017 ($ MILLIONS) 54

TECHNOLOGIES 55

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 55

METERS AND SENSORS 55

USER INTERFACES 56

TABLE 5 INTERFACE AND DECISION SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SMART GRID 57

WIRING AND NETWORKING 57

Neighborhood Area Networks 58

TABLE 6 ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMART GRID HOME AREA NETWORKS 58

Backbone Communications 58

SUPPLIERS 59

TABLE 7 UTILITY EMIS TECHNOLOGY PROVIDERS 59

MARKET 60

TABLE 8 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY EMIS BY TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 60

FIGURE 19 U.S. UTILITY EMIS TECHNOLOGY MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 61

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 61

TABLE 9 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY EMIS IT HARDWARE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 61

SOFTWARE 62

TABLE 10 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY EMIS SOFTWARE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 62

METERS AND SENSORS 62

TABLE 11 U.S. MARKET FOR AUTOMATICALLY READ AND SMART ELECTRIC METERS,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 63

AMR Meters 63

TABLE 12 U.S. MARKET FOR AMR METERS, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 63

Smart Meters 64

TABLE 13 U.S. MARKET FOR SMART METERS, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 64

USER INTERFACES 64

TABLE 14 MARKET FOR INTERFACE AND DECISION SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMART

GRID APPLICATIONS, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 65

WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS 65

TABLE 15 U.S. MARKET FOR AMR AND SMART GRID COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 65

Neighborhood Area Networks 65

TABLE 16 MARKET FOR SMART GRID NAN COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES, THROUGH

2017 (MILLION CONNECTIONS/$ MILLIONS) 66

Backbone 66

TABLE 17 MARKET FOR SMART GRID BACKBONE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 66

SERVICES 66

TABLE 18 U.S. MARKET FOR EMIS WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES USED

IN COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL/GOVERNMENT, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 67

CHAPTER 8 COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL/GOVERNMENT EMIS TECHNOLOGY 69

SUMMARY 69

FIGURE 20 U.S. MARKET FOR COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL/GOVERNMENT ENERGY

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 69

TECHNOLOGIES 69

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 69

SOFTWARE 70

Analysis and Modeling 70

METERING AND SENSORS 71

USER INTERFACES 71

ACTUATORS AND OUTPUT DEVICES 71

WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS 72

SUPPLIERS 72

TABLE 19 SUPPLIERS OF EMIS PRODUCTS AND SERVICES TO THE CIG SECTOR 73

MARKETS 73

TABLE 20 U.S. MARKET FOR COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING/GOVERNMENT EMIS BY TYPE

OF TECHNOLOGY, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 74

FIGURE 21 U.S. COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING/GOVERNMENT EMIS TECHNOLOGY

MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 75

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 75

TABLE 21 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING

HARDWARE, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 76

SOFTWARE 76

TABLE 22 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR EMIS SOFTWARE, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$

MILLIONS) 76

METERS AND SENSORS 76

TABLE 23 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR EMIS METERS AND SENSORS, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 76

USER INTERFACES 76

TABLE 24 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR EMIS INTERFACE AND DECISION SUPPORT

TECHNOLOGIES, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 77

WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS 77

TABLE 25 U.S. MARKET FOR EMIS WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES USED

IN CIG, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 77

SERVICES 77

TABLE 26 U.S. MARKET FOR EMIS WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES USED

IN CIG, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 78

CHAPTER 9 RESIDENTIAL EMIS 80

SUMMARY 80

FIGURE 22 U.S. RESIDENTIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MARKET,

2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 80

TECHNOLOGIES 80

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 81

Programmable Communicating Thermostats 81

METERS AND SENSORS 82

USER INTERFACES 82

In-Home Displays 82

Web-Based Interfaces 83

ACTUATORS AND OUTPUT DEVICES 83

Remote Actuators 83

Integrated Actuators 83

Plug-in Actuator 83

WIRING AND NETWORKING 84

SUPPLIERS 84

TABLE 27 PROVIDERS OF AUTOMATED HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, DEVICES

AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES 84

MARKETS 85

TABLE 28 U.S. RESIDENTIAL EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES MARKET, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 85

FIGURE 23 U.S. RESIDENTIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MARKET

SEGMENTS, 2011–2017 (%) 85

DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING HARDWARE 86

TABLE 29 U.S. MARKET FOR PROGRAMMABLE COMMUNICATING THERMOSTATS METERS,

THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 87

METERS AND SENSORS 87

TABLE 30 MARKET FOR RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION MONITORING SENSORS,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 88

USER INTERFACES 88

TABLE 31 U.S. MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT INTERFACES, THROUGH 2017

($ MILLIONS) 88

In-Home Displays 88

TABLE 32 MARKET FOR DEDICATED IN-HOME ENERGY DISPLAYS, THROUGH 2017

(MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 89

Web-Based Interfaces 89

TABLE 33 MARKET FOR WEB-BASED ENERGY CONSUMPTION MONITORING DEVICES*,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 90

ACTUATORS AND OUTPUT DEVICES 90

TABLE 34 U.S. MARKET FOR REMOTE APPLIANCE ACTUATORS, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 90

Integrated Actuators 90

TABLE 35 MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT INTEGRATED ACTUATORS,

THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 91

Plug-in Actuators 91

TABLE 36 U.S. MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLUG-IN ACTUATORS,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 92

WIRING AND NETWORKING 92

TABLE 37 U.S. MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY AUTOMATION WIRING AND NETWORKING,

2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 92

CHAPTER 10 TRANSPORTATION EMIS 94

SUMMARY 94

FIGURE 24 U.S. MARKET FOR TRANSPORTATION EMIS, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 94

TECHNOLOGIES 94

SUPPLIERS 95

TABLE 38 SUPPLIERS OF TRANSPORTATION EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES 95

MARKETS 95

TABLE 39 U.S. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

MARKET, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 96

FIGURE 25 U.S. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

MARKET SEGMENTS, 2011–2017 (%) 97

CHAPTER 11 INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS 99

GLOBAL ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ENVIRONMENT 99

GDP TRENDS 99

FIGURE 26 TRENDS IN WORLD GDP, 2007–2013 (ANNUAL PERCENTAGE CHANGE) 99

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION AND PRICES 100

Electricity Consumption 100

FIGURE 27 PROJECTED GROWTH IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, THROUGH 2017 (CAGR%) 100

Electricity Prices 101

INVESTMENT TRENDS 102

FIGURE 28 GLOBAL INVESTMENT TRENDS, 2007-2017 (GLOBAL INVESTMENT AS A

PERCENTAGE OF GDP) 102

GLOBAL TRENDS IN CONSTRUCTION 103

GLOBAL STANDARDS AND POLICY ENVIRONMENT 103

ENERGY MANAGEMENT STANDARDS 103

National Standards 103

International Standards 104

International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Standards 104

TABLE 40 ISO/PC 242 MEMBER COUNTRIES 105

European Union Standards 105

INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS 106

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 106

TABLE 41 PARTIES TO THE UN FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE 106

The Kyoto Protocol 107

TABLE 42 UNFCCC ANNEX I COUNTRIES 107

2011 Durban Conference 108

LEGISLATION AND REGULATION 108

Australia 108

Canada 109

China 109

Japan 109

South Korea 110

Turkey 110

GOVERNMENT STIMULUS PROGRAMS 111

TABLE 43 LARGEST SMART GRID STIMULUS INVESTMENT PROGRAMS BY COUNTRY ($

BILLIONS) 111

GLOBAL MARKETS 112

TABLE 44 GLOBAL MARKET FOR EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES BY COUNTRY/REGION,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 112

FIGURE 29 GLOBAL MARKET FOR EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES, 2011–2017 (%) 113

TABLE 45 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET BY EQUIPMENT/SERVICE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 114

FIGURE 30 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET EQUIPMENT/SERVICE SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 114

TABLE 46 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET BY END-USER SEGMENT, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 115

FIGURE 31 GLOBAL EMIS EQUIPMENT/SERVICE MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 115

CHAPTER 12 APPENDIX A: COMPANY PROFILES 118

EMIS SERVICES 118

ABB LTD. 118

AMERESCO INC. 118

ECOVA 118

BLACK & VEATCH 119

ENERWISE GLOBAL TECHNOLOGIES INC. 119

GE ENERGY 119

HEWLETT-PACKARD CO. 119

HITACHI CONSULTING CORP. 120

NAVIGANT CONSULTING INC. 120

N.V. NUON 120

PEPCO ENERGY SERVICES INC. 120

PJM INTERCONNECTION LLC 120

PROLIANCE ENERGY LLC 121

TETRA TECH EM INC. 121

U.S. ENERGY SERVICES INC. 121

WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC LLC 121

EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE 122

ADVANCED TELEMETRY LLC 122

AGILEWAVES INC. 122

ALLEGRO DEVELOPMENT CORP. 122

ALSTOM 123

ALVARION INC. 123

AMBIENT CORP. 123

ATMEL CORP. 124

BADGER METER INC. 124

BPL GLOBAL LTD. 124

COMVERGE INC. 124

COOPER INDUSTRIES INC. 125

CURRENT GROUP LLC 125

DYNAMIC ENERGY SYSTEMS 126

ECHELON CORP. 126

ECOBEE 126

ELSTER LLC 126

EMBER CORP. 127

EMETER CORP. 127

E-MON LP 127

ENERGATE INC. 128

ENERGENO LTD. 128

ENERGYICT INC. 129

ENERNOC 129

GAINSPAN CORP. 129

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 129

GOOGLE.ORG 130

GREEN ENERGY OPTIONS LTD. 130

GREENBOX TECHNOLOGY 130

GRID NET INC. 131

HOME AUTOMATION INC. 131

HONEYWELL AUTOMATION AND CONTROL SOLUTIONS 131

INTERGRAPH CORP. 131

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES 132

ITRON INC. 132

LANDIS+GYR AG 133

LIVEDATA INC. 133

LUCID DESIGN GROUP LLC 133

MAIN.NET POWER LINE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 133

MILSOFT INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS 134

MMB RESEARCH INC. 134

ONZO LTD. 134

PEOPLENET COMMUNICATIONS CORP. 135

POWERIT SOLUTIONS 135

POWERWORLD CORP. 135

RADIO THERMOSTAT COMPANY OF AMERICA 135

ROCKWELL AUTOMATION 136

RUGGEDCOM INC. 136

SATEC INC. 136

SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC SA 137

SENSUS METERING SYSTEMS 137

SEQUENTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS LLC 137

SIEMENS 138

Siemens Building Technologies Ltd. 138

Siemens Building Technologies Inc. 138

Siemens Energy & Automation Inc. 138

SIGMA DESIGNS INC. 138

SIGNATURE ENERGY MANAGEMENT 139

SILVER SPRING NETWORKS 139

SMARTSYNCH 140

SPACE-TIME-INSIGHT 140

TELKONET INC. 140

TENDRIL NETWORKS INC. 141

TOSHIBA CORP. 141

TRILLIANT NETWORKS 141

CHAPTER 13 APPENDIX B: PATENT ANALYSIS 143

TABLE 47 U.S. EMIS PATENTS ISSUED THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2012, BY TECHNOLOGY TYPE

(NUMBER OF PATENTS) 143

FIGURE 32 U.S. EMIS PATENT SHARES BY TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY (%) 143

TABLE 48 ASSIGNEES BY NUMBER OF PATENTS (NUMBER OF U.S. EMIS PATENTS ISSUED

AS OF SEPT. 1, 2012) 144

TABLE 49 EMIS PATENTS ISSUED THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2012 BY NATIONALITY OF ASSIGNEE

(NUMBER OF U.S. EMIS PATENTS ISSUED AS OF SEPT. 1, 2012) 145

FIGURE 33 EMIS PATENTS ISSUED THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2012 BY NATIONALITY OF

ASSIGNEE (%) 146

LIST OF TABLES

SUMMARY TABLE GLOBAL EMIS MARKET, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 6

TABLE 1 U.S. EMIS MARKET BY TYPE OF EQUIPMENT/SERVICE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 13

TABLE 2 U.S. EMIS MARKET BY END-USER SEGMENT, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 16

TABLE 3 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET BY GEOGRAPHICAL SEGMENT, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 17

TABLE 4 REMODELING MARKET INDEX TRENDS, 2005-2012 (RMI) 31

TABLE 5 INTERFACE AND DECISION SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SMART GRID 57

TABLE 6 ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMART GRID HOME AREA NETWORKS 58

TABLE 7 UTILITY EMIS TECHNOLOGY PROVIDERS 59

TABLE 8 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY EMIS BY TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 60

TABLE 9 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY EMIS IT HARDWARE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 61

TABLE 10 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY EMIS SOFTWARE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 62

TABLE 11 U.S. MARKET FOR AUTOMATICALLY READ AND SMART ELECTRIC METERS,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 63

TABLE 12 U.S. MARKET FOR AMR METERS, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 63

TABLE 13 U.S. MARKET FOR SMART METERS, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 64

TABLE 14 MARKET FOR INTERFACE AND DECISION SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES FOR SMART

GRID APPLICATIONS, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 65

TABLE 15 U.S. MARKET FOR AMR AND SMART GRID COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 65

TABLE 16 MARKET FOR SMART GRID NAN COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES, THROUGH

2017 (MILLION CONNECTIONS/$ MILLIONS) 66

TABLE 17 MARKET FOR SMART GRID BACKBONE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 66

TABLE 18 U.S. MARKET FOR EMIS WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES USED

IN COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL/GOVERNMENT, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 67

TABLE 19 SUPPLIERS OF EMIS PRODUCTS AND SERVICES TO THE CIG SECTOR 73

TABLE 20 U.S. MARKET FOR COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING/GOVERNMENT EMIS BY TYPE

OF TECHNOLOGY, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 74

TABLE 21 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR DATA ACQUISITION, STORAGE AND PROCESSING

HARDWARE, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 76

TABLE 22 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR EMIS SOFTWARE, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$

MILLIONS) 76

TABLE 23 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR EMIS METERS AND SENSORS, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 76

TABLE 24 U.S. CIG MARKET FOR EMIS INTERFACE AND DECISION SUPPORT TECHNOLOGIES,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 77

TABLE 25 U.S. MARKET FOR EMIS WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES USED

IN CIG, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 77

TABLE 26 U.S. MARKET FOR EMIS WIRING AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES USED

IN CIG, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 78

TABLE 27 PROVIDERS OF AUTOMATED HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, DEVICES

AND RELATED TECHNOLOGIES 84

TABLE 28 U.S. RESIDENTIAL EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES MARKET, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 85

TABLE 29 U.S. MARKET FOR PROGRAMMABLE COMMUNICATING THERMOSTATS METERS,

THROUGH 2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 87

TABLE 30 MARKET FOR RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION MONITORING SENSORS,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 88

TABLE 31 U.S. MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT INTERFACES, THROUGH 2017 ($

MILLIONS) 88

TABLE 32 MARKET FOR DEDICATED IN-HOME ENERGY DISPLAYS, THROUGH 2017 (MILLION

UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 89

TABLE 33 MARKET FOR WEB-BASED ENERGY CONSUMPTION MONITORING DEVICES*,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 90

TABLE 34 U.S. MARKET FOR REMOTE APPLIANCE ACTUATORS, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 90

TABLE 35 MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT INTEGRATED ACTUATORS, THROUGH

2017 (MILLION UNITS/$ MILLIONS) 91

TABLE 36 U.S. MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLUG-IN ACTUATORS, THROUGH

2017 ($ MILLIONS) 92

TABLE 37 U.S. MARKET FOR HOME ENERGY AUTOMATION WIRING AND NETWORKING,

2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 92

TABLE 38 SUPPLIERS OF TRANSPORTATION EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES 95

TABLE 39 U.S. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MARKET,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 96

TABLE 40 ISO/PC 242 MEMBER COUNTRIES 105

TABLE 41 PARTIES TO THE UN FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE 106

TABLE 42 UNFCCC ANNEX I COUNTRIES 107

TABLE 43 LARGEST SMART GRID STIMULUS INVESTMENT PROGRAMS BY COUNTRY ($

BILLIONS) 111

TABLE 44 GLOBAL MARKET FOR EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES BY COUNTRY/REGION,

THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 112

TABLE 45 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET BY EQUIPMENT/SERVICE, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 114

TABLE 46 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET BY END-USER SEGMENT, THROUGH 2017 ($ MILLIONS) 115

TABLE 47 U.S. EMIS PATENTS ISSUED THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2012, BY TECHNOLOGY TYPE

(NUMBER OF PATENTS) 143

TABLE 48 ASSIGNEES BY NUMBER OF PATENTS (NUMBER OF U.S. EMIS PATENTS ISSUED

AS OF SEPT. 1, 2012) 144

TABLE 49 EMIS PATENTS ISSUED THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2012 BY NATIONALITY OF ASSIGNEE

(NUMBER OF U.S. EMIS PATENTS ISSUED AS OF SEPT. 1, 2012) 145

LIST OF FIGURES

SUMMARY FIGURE GLOBAL EMIS MARKET, 2011-2017 ($ MILLIONS) 6

FIGURE 1 U.S. EMIS MARKET, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 14

FIGURE 2 U.S. EMIS EQUIPMENT/SERVICE MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 14

FIGURE 3 U.S. EMIS EQUIPMENT/SERVICE MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 16

FIGURE 4 GLOBAL EMIS GEOGRAPHICAL MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 17

FIGURE 5 U.S. SHAREHOLDER-OWNED UTILITIES' CAPITAL EXPENDITURES, 2005–2014 ($

BILLIONS) 20

FIGURE 6 ANNUAL GROWTH IN U.S. ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, 2001-2015 (%) 21

FIGURE 7 TRENDS IN COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING ELECTRICITY PRICES, 2005-2011 (%

CHANGE VS. PREVIOUS YEAR) 23

FIGURE 8 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. PRIVATE, NON-RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PUT IN

PLACE, 2005–2017 ($ BILLIONS) 24

FIGURE 9 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. GROSS PRIVATE NON-HOUSEHOLD INVESTMENT,

2005–2012 ($ BILLIONS) 24

FIGURE 10 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. PUBLIC NON-INFRASTRUCTURE CONSTRUCTION PUT

IN PLACE, 2005–2017 ($ BILLIONS) 26

FIGURE 11 TRENDS IN VALUE OF U.S. PUBLIC INVESTMENT, 2005–2012 ($ BILLIONS) 26

FIGURE 12 TRENDS IN RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY PRICES, 2005-2012 (% CHANGE VS.

PREVIOUS YEAR) 28

FIGURE 13 TRENDS IN U.S. PUBLIC CONCERNS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING, 2001-2012 (%) 28

FIGURE 14 TRENDS IN U.S. HOUSING STARTS, 2005-2017 (MILLION STARTS) 30

FIGURE 15 RECENT TRENDS IN U.S. CONSUMER SPENDING, 2003-2010 (AVERAGE %

INCREASE/DECREASE VS. PREVIOUS YEAR) 32

FIGURE 16 EMIS IN OPERATION 46

FIGURE 17 ENERGY MANAGEMENT CONTROL PROCESS 49

FIGURE 18 U.S. MARKET FOR UTILITY ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS,

2011-2017 ($ MILLIONS) 54

FIGURE 19 U.S. UTILITY EMIS TECHNOLOGY MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 61

FIGURE 20 U.S. MARKET FOR COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL/GOVERNMENT ENERGY

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 69

FIGURE 21 U.S. COMMERCIAL/MANUFACTURING/GOVERNMENT EMIS TECHNOLOGY

MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 75

FIGURE 22 U.S. RESIDENTIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MARKET,

2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 80

FIGURE 23 U.S. RESIDENTIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS MARKET

SEGMENTS, 2011–2017 (%) 85

FIGURE 24 U.S. MARKET FOR TRANSPORTATION EMIS, 2011–2017 ($ MILLIONS) 94

FIGURE 25 U.S. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

MARKET SEGMENTS, 2011–2017 (%) 97

FIGURE 26 TRENDS IN WORLD GDP, 2007–2013 (ANNUAL PERCENTAGE CHANGE) 99

FIGURE 27 PROJECTED GROWTH IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, THROUGH 2017 (CAGR%) 100

FIGURE 28 GLOBAL INVESTMENT TRENDS, 2007-2017 (GLOBAL INVESTMENT AS A

PERCENTAGE OF GDP) 102

FIGURE 29 GLOBAL MARKET FOR EMIS EQUIPMENT AND SERVICES, 2011–2017 (%) 113

FIGURE 30 GLOBAL EMIS MARKET EQUIPMENT/SERVICE SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 114

FIGURE 31 GLOBAL EMIS EQUIPMENT/SERVICE MARKET SHARES, 2011–2017 (%) 115

FIGURE 32 U.S. EMIS PATENT SHARES BY TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY (%) 143

FIGURE 33 EMIS PATENTS ISSUED THROUGH SEPT. 20, 2012 BY NATIONALITY OF ASSIGNEE

(%) 146

To order this report:

Energy_technology Industry: Energy Management Information Systems: Global Markets

Contact Nicolas: [email protected]
US: (805)-652-2626
Intl: +1 805-652-2626

SOURCE Reportlinker

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